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The Purpose of Digestive Enzymes
 
 
We have discussed digestion before, but we are often asked about digestive enzymes; how they work, are they safe to take all the time and do they affect your body’s natural production of digestive enzymes. So, let's try to provide you with a better understanding of digestive enzymes. Digestive enzymes are naturally occurring substances produced by your mouth, stomach, gallbladder, small intestine, and pancreas. Their
function is to help you break down the food you consume into smaller molecules including fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, simple sugars, cholesterol and nucleic acids. Once the foods you consume are broken down into small molecules, the nutrients contained within them are absorbed through the wall of the small intestine into your blood and transported throughout your body. What has not been absorbed moves through the colon as waste. If enzyme production is essential for your life, you may wonder why your body stops or slows down its natural production of these critical molecules. There could be a medical reason such as the removal of your gallbladder, pancreatic conditions and several underlying causes such as leaky gut, chronic inflammation, Crohn's, food sensitives, ageing, low stomach acid, candida, SIBO and other bowel disorders. Your gut needs to function optimally to produce much-needed enzymes and to break down the food you consume into the smaller particles for absorption. Failure to do so can make gut problems start or worsen. Taking supplemental enzymes can give your body a helping hand to achieve better digestion and ultimately better absorption. The interesting thing about digestive enzymes is that they support the body’s enzyme function, they do not replace it, which means if your body is producing enzymes, it will continue to do so, and digestive supplements will provide added support. Consider a digestive enzyme if you suffer from stomach upset, indigestion, constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, ageing or liver diseases.
 
 
Which Digestive Enzyme for Which Purpose?
 
 
Digestive enzyme supplements provide the same functions as the enzymes that you naturally produce. The main difference is how digestive supplements are manufactured. Digestive supplements come from three different sources. The first is fruit sources such as pineapple papaya, or apples. The second is animal-sourced from ox or hog and the third is from plant sources such as yeast or fungi. We like the Digestive Enzyme products from Renew Life because they are all plant-derived (no animal products). Consider a full spectrum of plant-based digestive enzymes such as Renew Life DigestMore, which
contains all the different types of enzymes to break down the various types of food you consume. DigestMore is beneficial for occasional gas and bloating after a meal. If you have digestive disorders consider taking Renew Life DigestMore Ultra Enzymes with each meal, it can help to reduce the stress on your digestive organs, break down those hard to digest foods and assimilate the nutrients more efficiently. Renew Life Lactase Enzyme helps to digest the sugars found in dairy products and can help to alleviate the symptoms associated with lactose intolerance, (bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, cramping). Renew Life GasStop contains the enzyme Alpha-Galactosidase, which helps break down complex sugars and fats found in foods that can be more challenging to digest (peanuts, beans, lentils, cabbage, broccoli, etc.) Gas Stop also contains a full spectrum of enzymes for all the food groups. Renew Life Digest More HCL is a comprehensive digestive enzyme formula that contains Betaine Hydrochloride (HCl) and butyric acid, which makes it helpful for those who suffer from heartburn caused by low stomach acid. Renew Life Heartburn Stop is made with herbs, minerals and enzymes that help to neutralize stomach acidity for the relief of occasional heartburn.
 
 
Resources
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5350578/
https://fg.bmj.com/content/2/1/48.short
https://www.europeanreview.org/article/957
 
 
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