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How Did Your Hair Turn Grey?
 
 
As a woman, when you start to see grey hairs, it usually signifies it’s time to make another appointment at the hair salon, whereas men often wear it as a badge of honour. Social norms and personal preference tend to determine how a person will accept their changing hair colour. However, greying hair on women is becoming the new chic acceptance of ageing gracefully. But have you ever wondered why one person’s hair turns grey quicker than another’s or what turns hair grey in the first place? Hair colour is produced by pigment cells called melanocytes, found within hair follicles. Melanocytes produces
melanin, which forms the pigment/colour. As hair grows, the pigment/colour continues to develop, creating a full head of brown, blonde, or whatever colour genetics has decided. As you age, there are a few factors that will lead to greying hair. First, the melanocytes become less active and eventually stop producing your hair colour, resulting in grey or white hair. If the shaft of the hair has a small amount of pigment left, hair becomes grey. White hair has no melanin left at all, leaving only the colour of the keratin (the protein that makes up hair) showing. The fact is, everyone will turn grey eventually! Did you know that individuals with blonde or red hair are most likely to have white or grey hair early on since their hair already has a reduced amount of pigment? So, the question is, “Is there anything that you can do to slow this process?”
 
 
Can You Stop Hair from Turning Grey?
 
 
During the natural ageing process, melanocytes are less active, which results in reduced production of hair colour (melanin). How fast this happens is a matter of genetics. However, other changes that occur within your body also play a role in greying hair. Researchers recently discovered that going grey may be self-inflicted by the process of dying our hair. When you dye your hair different colours, for the colour to adhere to your hair, you have to first remove the colour that is in your hair pigment. Hydrogen Peroxide is a widely used substance to do this. Hydrogen Peroxide bleaches your hair from the inside. Usually, an enzyme you produce called “catalase” will break down the hydrogen
peroxide into oxygen and water for removal. But, as you get older, the production of this enzyme slows down, and subsequently, the peroxide is not removed adequately. The good news is that “catalase” is not the only molecule that breaks down hydrogen peroxide. Glutathione, which is produced by your liver, can also turn hydrogen peroxide into water for removal. The bad news – as you get older glutathione production decreases. The good news – you can supplement with glutathione. Now Foods Glutathione as a 500mg dosage dosage that should be taken daily at bedtime. Glutathione is also the king of antioxidant supplements and provides several other health benefits. You can also help your declining “catalase“ production by taking the herbal supplement “Ashwagandha.” It increases “catalase” production and also protects you from the free radical damage of hydrogen peroxide. Ashwagandha may also help increase the amount of hair melanin you produce. As a side note: When your body’s production of catalase can no longer do the required work of removing hydrogen peroxide, two other body defence systems will kick in called methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B protein (MSR A and B). However, ageing decreases these enzymes as well. 

Supplements such as L-Cystine dosage that should be taken daily at bedtime. Glutathione is also the king of antioxidant supplements and provides several other health benefits. You can also help your declining “catalase“ production by taking the herbal supplement “Ashwagandha.” It increases “catalase” production and also protects you from the free radical damage of hydrogen peroxide. Ashwagandha may also help increase the amount of hair melanin you produce. As a side note: When your body’s production of catalase can no longer do the required work of removing hydrogen peroxide, two other body defence systems will kick in called methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B protein (MSR A and B). However, ageing decreases these enzymes as well. (Natural Factors L-Tyrosine) and should be taken twice a day. Lastly, a deficiency in B vitamins; B6 and B12, PABA and Pantothenic Acid (vitamin B5), which are all part of the vitamin B family, can lead to early greying. We suggest adding an extra Biotin supplement (also a B vitamin) because Biotin helps produce keratin, which is a major component of hair and nails. There is not enough evidence to support any reversal of greying hair. However, by targeting the molecular pathways that cause hair greying, as mentioned above, you may be able to slow it down or prevent it, especially if you are a regular user of hydrogen peroxide. The other option is to embrace your grey as a natural part of ageing, which is now both socially accepted and encouraged.
 
 
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