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Can you Blame it on Your Hormones?
 
 
Some things get better with age while certain things get downright difficult. And if you are a woman experiencing perimenopause (the transition to menopause) or one who has reached menopause, weight loss can be a challenging hurdle to overcome. It doesn’t take numerous studies to show that the menopausal transition can result in undesirable changes in
body composition, where fat tends to shift from hips and thighs to your belly. You may be consuming a good diet, doing moderate exercise and seemingly doing everything right, but you still seem to be struggling with weight gain. This is one of those times that we can blame it on the hormones. Perimenopause most often begins in your ’40s and is marked by a reduction in estrogen production by the ovaries. This reduction of female hormone production does not occur all at once, and as such, there are often sporadic ups and downs of estrogen production resulting in irregular menstrual cycles. Symptoms associated with this time of life can include headaches, concentration difficulties, anxiety, loss of libido, and more. It makes sense when you look at the role of women’s hormones but where does the weight gain fit in? Sex hormones strongly influence fat metabolism and body fat distribution. The decrease and absence of estrogens (specifically estradiol) during perimenopause results in the dreaded belly fat accumulation found around the abdomen and midsection (including the organs). It is known as visceral fat.
 
 
What’s a Woman to Do?
 
 
Menopause is inevitable, but excess weight does not have to be. As you enter into perimenopause, you may experience changes such as hot flashes, night sweats and mood swings. Take this as the first sign that your body composition and fat distribution may likely change as well, so take action early on. Take stock of your patterns. Consider the amount of daily/weekly exercise you engage in, the amount and types of food you eat and even your stress levels. Understand that it is important to adjust to this new phase of your life. If you were relatively inactive in the past, you need to find a way to get moving each day. Your body metabolizes foods for energy a bit differently, and with the hormonal shift
some of those food groups and late-night snacks add calories and no longer burn for fuel and become stored as fat. Review your food intake, how many calories do you consume vs. how many do you burn? Research suggests middle age or older adults should increase protein intake to higher than recommended guidelines so consider including a high-quality source like whey protein, which can aid muscle gain and assist the fat burning process. Add Omega 3 essential fatty acids from wild-caught salmon, halibut, sardines, mackerel and anchovies. Studies show that regular consumption of omega-3s support hormone production. Support the Process with Natural Factors CLA (conjugated linoleic acid). CLA has a wide range of beneficial activity including weight loss and an increase in lean muscle mass.

Furthermore, studies suggest potential benefits to prevent and offset menopausal symptoms and may offer protective effects against postmenopausal bone loss. Include supplements such as WomenSense MenoSense, it contains a combination of key ingredients to support hormonal changes for both perimenopause and menopause. Hormonal and physical changes in a woman’s life, such as menopause, all have an impact on sleep health. Recent evidence suggests that sleep loss could be a risk factor that affects your mood, heart, weight, and blood sugar. WomenSense SomniSense® offers an herbal solution for women who want a natural sleep aid. Increase your B Vitamins – B Complex (Natural Factors 50 Complex) supports your entire central nervous system and can have a dramatic effect on mood, nerve function and metabolism.
 
 
Resources
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16034185
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19021869
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460719
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17192296
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459594/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4574006/
 
 
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