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Kids May Need 10 Times More Vitamin D Than You Think
 
 
You may think that your children are getting all the vitamin D they need if they are drinking milk, which has been fortified with vitamin D however, new evidence is emerging that as early as infancy, children are not getting enough vitamin D. Consider that the main source of vitamin D is produced internally in the body through the exposure of sun on your skin.  Mother’s breast milk does not
contain enough vitamin D to meet requirements. Reaching for vitamin drops for infants and supplemental vitamin D is becoming the new norm for children, as well as adults.  According to the AAP clinical report “Optimizing Bone Health in Children and Adolescents”, infants under 12 months require 400 International Units (IU) per day and older children and adolescents require up to 600-1000 IU per day. A decrease in vitamin D may be caused by many factors including lifestyle changes, less sun exposure (too much direct sun exposure can be harmful), an increased amount of sunscreen use, and less consumption of foods fortified with vitamin D.  A decrease of vitamin D in early childhood can lead to a decrease into adulthood.  Emerging research is accompanied by a better understanding of the benefits of vitamin D in children. Vitamin D helps to ensure the body absorbs and retains calcium and phosphorus, which are critical minerals in the formation and the building of bones.  If growing bones do not have enough essential minerals for bone growth and strength, bone softening diseases can emerge such as rickets, delayed motor development, muscle weakness, aches and pains, and even fractures.
 
 
Children Can Supplement with Vitamin D
 
 
Why all the fuss about vitamin D supplements and children?  Because today, children are not getting the required vitamin D through diet alone and are more at risk if they do not spend enough time outdoors (sunny conditions), if their skin is covered when outdoors (clothes or sunscreen), if they have darker skin which does not absorb vitamin D, if they have been breast fed and mommy was low in vitamin D, and even certain illnesses and medications can affect vitamin D production.  When choosing a vitamin D supplement for your child, consider their age, lifestyle (skin exposure to sunlight), intake of foods that are fortified with vitamin D such as orange juice, yogurt, cereals, as well as fatty fishes such as
salmon, tuna, and sardines. It is important to supplement accordingly. For infants, look for vitamin D in liquid with no added sugar and once they have reached the age of 6, consider a kid’s vitamin D such as Progressive Sunshine Burst Vitamin D for Kids which plays an important role in the healthy development of bones and teeth. It provides 1,000 IU of vitamin D3 in each chewable softgel with a kid friendly natural lemon taste.  Sunshine Burst is also completely free of the additives commonly found in children's chewable vitamin D supplements. It contains no binders, fillers, lactose, cellulose, or stearates.
Key Points
New evidence is emerging that as early as infancy, children are not getting enough vitamin D.
When choosing a vitamin D supplement for your child consider their age and lifestyle
Progressive Sunshine Burst Vitamin D for Kids plays an important role in the healthy development of bones
 
 
Resources
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3476526/
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/134/4/e1229
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16948623
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17600035
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/136/4/625
 
 
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